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Depression: Remission (Feeling Better)

Depression is more than feeling sad or "blue". Depression can interfere with daily life. Most people who seek treatment can improve to where they feel better and have few symptoms of depression or none at all. This is called being in remission.

The Depression Remission measure reports on how well clinics help patients with depression reach remission and improve to where they say they have few symptoms of depression or none at all.

  • The average 6-month remission rate for all reporting clinics is 8%.
  • The average 12-month remission rate for all reporting clinics is 6%.

Care You Should Expect to Receive
High-quality care for treatment of depression may include medication, sessions with a therapist or lifestyle changes. It can take time to find the treatment that works best for you. Receiving a diagnosis, customizing a treatment plan and following up with your doctor are very important. Your provider should ask you to complete a Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), also called the PHQ-9, during each visit to see if you are getting better.

Symptoms of depression can interfere with a patient’s daily life:

  • lack of appetite or increased appetite
  • sleeping too much or too little
  • loss of interest in once pleasurable activities
  • feeling of hopelessness

How Will This Help Me?
Even patients with severe depression can get better. It can take time to find the treatment that works best for you. This is why correct diagnosis, a customized treatment plan and following up with your doctor are so important. Our information will show you how many patients at a clinic improved so they had few symptoms or none at all, 6 months and 12 months after starting treatment.



Mayo Clinic - Baldwin Building, Family Medicine

Web: www.mayoclinic.org
Main Phone: 507-284-5300

Depression - Response at 6 Months

Most Recent Report

Rate: 20%
*
July 01 2012 to June 30 2013
(* Avg: 13%)
Rate: 16%
*
July 01 2011 to June 30 2012
(* Avg: 12%)
Rate: 21%
*
July 01 2010 to June 30 2011
(* Avg: 10%)
Rate: 16%
*
July 01 2009 to June 30 2010
(* Avg: 9%)

Depression - Response at 12 Months

Most Recent Report

Rate: 18%
*
January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012
(* Avg: 10%)
Rate: 17%
*
Jan 1 2011 - Dec 31 2011
(* Avg: 9%)
Rate: 17%
*
Jan 1 2010 - Dec 31 2010
(* Avg: 9%)
Rate: 7%
*
Jan 1 2009 - Dec 31 2009
(* Avg: 8%)

Depression - Remission at 6 Months

Most Recent Report

Rate: 13%
*
July 01 2012 to June 30 2013
(* Avg: 8%)
Rate: 12%
*
July 01 2011 to June 30 2012
(* Avg: 7%)
Rate: 13%
*
July 01 2010 to June 30 2011
(* Avg: 6%)
Rate: 12%
*
July 01 2009 to June 30 2010
(* Avg: 5%)

Depression - Remission at 12 Months

Most Recent Report

Rate: 12%
*
January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012
(* Avg: 6%)
Rate: 10%
*
Jan 1 2011 - Dec 31 2011
(* Avg: 6%)
Rate: 10%
*
Jan 1 2010 - Dec 31 2010
(* Avg: 5%)
Rate: 1%
*
Jan 1 2009 - Dec 31 2009
(* Avg: 5%)

Depression - PHQ-9 Follow-up at 6 Months

Most Recent Report

Rate: 37%
*
July 01 2012 to June 30 2013
(* Avg: 31%)
Rate: 31%
*
July 01 2011 to June 30 2012
(* Avg: 28%)

Depression - PHQ-9 Follow-up at 12 Months

Most Recent Report

Rate: 32%
*
January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012
(* Avg: 23%)
Rate: 30%
*
Jan 1 2011 - Dec 31 2011
(* Avg: 22%)

Depression - Use of the PHQ-9

Most Recent Report

Rate: 85%
*
October 1, 2013 through January 31, 2014
(* Avg: 70%)
Rate: 84%
*
June 1 2013 through September 30 2013
(* Avg: 69%)
Rate: 89%
*
Feb 1 2013 through May 31 2013
(* Avg: 68%)
Rate: 84%
*
Oct 1 2012 through Jan 31 2013
(* Avg: 69%)
Rate: 80%
*
June 1 2012 through Sept 30 2012
(* Avg: 67%)
Rate: 76%
*
Oct 1 2011 through Jan 31 2012
(* Avg: 67%)
Rate: 77%
*
June 1 2011 through Sept 30 2011
(* Avg: 67%)
Rate: 76%
*
Feb 1 2011 through May 31 2011
(* Avg: 65%)
Rate: 74%
*
Oct 1 2010 through Jan 31 2011
(* Avg: 61%)
Rate: 71%
*
June 1 2010 through Sept 30 2010
(* Avg: 59%)
Rate: 71%
*
Feb 1 2010 through May 31 2010
(* Avg: 54%)
Rate: 58%
*
Oct 1 2009 through Jan 31 2010
(* Avg: 54%)